About the CLIO Project

This project grew out of my Open Access edition of the Liber pharetrae, a 13th-century florilegium containing over 3500 Latin quotations from classical, patristic and medieval authors. In the process of identifying those quotations, I became aware that Burgundio of Pisa’s Latin translation of Chrysostom’s homilies on John had never been printed, yet it is cited in the Liber pharetrae for over 40 quotations, is heavily cited in Thomas Aquinas’ Catena aurea and other influential scholastic texts, and was the only Latin translation available for nearly 300 years. As a “spin-off” result of the CLIO Project, I have been able to identify all of the quotations from Burgundio’s translation in the Liber pharetrae.

Seed funding for this Open Access project was provided through a 2016 Insight Development Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Additional funding to complete the first phase of this project and launch the second phase was awarded in a 2019 SSHRC Insight Grant. Most of those funds have been used to employ the following student Research Assistants whose contributions to this project have been instrumental in the development of this digital resource:

- Marian Toledo Candelaria, Doctoral Candidate in the Tri-University History Graduate Program, University of Guelph: generated draft transcriptions of portions of the Paris manuscript for Burgundio's translation (2016-18).

- Andrew Moore, Doctoral Candidate in the Tri-University History Graduate Program, University of Waterloo: generated draft transcriptions of portions of the Paris manuscript for Burgundio’s translation (2016-17).

- Daniel Cockcroft, MA & MLIS in Humanities Computing Program, University of Alberta: Webmaster of the CLIO Project website (2016-present).

- Sebastian Lidbetter, MA candidate in History, Wilfrid Laurier University: generated draft transcriptions of a portion of the 1470 edition of Griffolini's translation, and collated variants for a portion of the 1603 Heidelberg edition (2019).

- Taylor Tryburski, Ancient Mediterranean Studies and Medieval Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, and subsequently the Master of Information Program, University of Toronto: generated draft transcriptions of a portion of the 1470 edition of Griffolini's translation, digitized the 1728 edition of Montfaucon’s Greek edition and Latin translation from the copy in the Wilfrid Laurier University Library, and segmented of a portion of Montfaucon’s Greek edition (2016-present).

- Heather Smith, History and Medieval Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University: generated draft transcriptions of portions of the 1470 edition of Griffolini's translation (2017-18).

- Katelyn Leece, History and Medieval Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University: generated draft transcriptions of portions of the 1728 edition of Montfaucon's translation (2017-18).

The Associate Editor of the CLIO Project is Dr. Joel Kalvesmaki, Director of the Text Alignment Network (TAN), who was a collaborator on both the SSHRC Insight Development Grant and the SSHRC Insight Grant; a member of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), he has provided guidance to Daniel Cockcroft and developed the algorithms behind the workflow for producing the TAN/TEI corpus of the CLIO Project.

Also serving as collaborators on those grants were Dr. Frank Tompa and Dr. Andrew Kane of the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo, creators of the Janus Intertextuality Search Engine for the Electronic Manipulus florum Project. Frank and Andrew will develop a search engine for the CLIO Project when Phase 1 is completed.

Funding towards the acquisition of a planetary scanner for the Laurier Library was provided in 2017 through a Category B Equipment Grant from Laurier's Office of Research Services, with matching funds provided by the University Library, to enable the scanning of the library’s copy of the 1728 edition of Montfaucon’s Latin translation and Greek edition. Dillon Moore, MLIS, Head of Digital Initiatives at the Laurier University Library, was the collaborator on this grant application.

Finally, many thanks are also due to Navjot Dhaliwal, Scott Elliot, and Tim Didier in Laurier’s Information and Communication Technologies office, who worked with Daniel Cockcroft and the editor in migrating the CLIO Project to a server at Wilfrid Laurier University from its original home on a server with the Humanities Computing program at the University of Alberta.

For more information on Phase 1 and proposed work for Phases 2 and 3, see the Methodology page.


© CHRIS L. NIGHMAN 2016-20